Animal Ag Engage


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I am a voice for agriculture and I am learning to speak up

Dallas Dooley is a 2016 College Aggies Online competitor from New Mexico State University and winner of the week three challenge: Introduction Blog Post. Visit her blog to read more.

“Be fearless in the pursuit of what sets your soul on fire.” I have never been one to stand around and watch idly as my dreams surpass me, so naturally it made sense for me to join College Aggies Online and seize this amazing opportunity to spread truth about the industry that I love. You may have seen me posting more than usual on social media. I have started using hashtags, cool graphics and facts about livestock. But what is this #CAO16, and why do I use it so much?

transparent-caoWhat does CAO stand for?

First off, CAO is short for College Aggies Online. We are a bunch of passionate agriculture students and groups from across the U.S. Though we may not always be on the same side of the stadium come Saturday, we stand hand in hand when it comes to loving agriculture.

What is my role in #CAO16?

As a 2016 competitor, my role in College Aggies Online is to create social media posts that reflect common misconceptions in the agricultural industries. Some of these hot topics include hormones, antibiotic use and animal welfare. Each week for 9 weeks, there is a different animal theme. Via Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and my blog, I tell Ag’s story one post at a time.

Who am I?

Who am I? Who am I? *begin terrible Eddy Murphy impression of Mushu from Mulan* I am the generous, the gregarious, the indispensable Dallas Dooley. I grew up on a small family farm where we raised everything but wages. After I left for college at New Mexico State University, my mom started a horse rescue called Phoenix Equine. She is a firm believer that bad things happen to good people, and she gives all horses a second chance at life and service. If you ask me, her compassion extends to more than just horses which is why our farm looks more like a petting zoo than a business. However, my mother’s compassion is the trait I am most proud to have inherited. It allows me to step back and gives me time to try and understand when someone shares an opinion different than my own.

Growing up on a farm taught me how to love and care for animals, though I was not always so good with the ones that could talk back (aka humans). After leaving the farm and going to a university that was several hours removed from my friends, family and animals, I started to get really involved to fill the void of farm chores. As a result, my social skills began to blossom. Years later, I am able to carry on a conversation with a brick wall if necessary, but I can still sympathize with agriculturalists who struggle with talking to people not directly related to the farm. I am a voice for agriculture and through College Aggies Online, I am learning to speak up.

Time flies when you are having fun. Being a competitor in #CAO16 is no different. We are already at the end of week 5! If you are having a great time keeping up with all of our posts, don’t fret because we still have four weeks to go. Don’t forget to check back in with me for next week’s theme: Dairy Cows.

Follow Dallas on Twitter and Instagram!

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8 Reasons to Celebrate FFA

12063584_10205154888819727_4930963141184318554_n“I believe in the future of agriculture…”

I vividly remember reciting these words over and over in my head during my first course in agricultural education. This iconic line is the first phrase in the FFA Creed. It is a line that FFA members, past and present, can recite without hesitation because of its symbolism and the bond that ties us all together. From the first time I recited the FFA Creed to earning my American FFA Degree six years later; this organization has truly helped me become the person I am today.

If you are not familiar with FFA, here some of the basics of the organization that has touched the lives of thousands of students.

  • It was founded by 33 students in 1928 as ‘Future Farmers of America.’
  • Although it once stood for that, it is now referred to as The National FFA Organization to better accommodate the growing diversity of its members.
  • It is the largest student-led organization in the world with 649,355 members who are a part of 7,859 chapters.
  • The mission of The National FFA Organization is: “FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education”

The FFA Motto: Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve.

Check out The National FFA Organization for more information!

This week happens to be an e10292278_869204976434761_2988694273467545930_nxtra special one for The National FFA Organization. On Wednesday October, 19 FFA will kick off its 89th National FFA Convention & Expo in Indianapolis. It is a gathering of over 63,000 members and guests, who are there to learn, lead, grow and celebrate the accomplishments of members and chapters across the country. While I am very envious of everyone at convention right now, I am ecstatic to share with you all eight reasons why we should always Celebrate FFA!

  1. A Rich History – Whenever a member zips up the golden zipper of a blue corduroy jacket, there is a sense of pride that overfills them. Being a part of a tradition that dates back to 1928 is something to be proud of. FFA was founded on the belief in the future of agriculture and that will never change. It is the bond that ties present and past members together.
  2. Personal Development – In high school, I was a shy, timid freshman. It was not until I found my place in the FFA that I truly developed into the person I am today. FFA is helping students to find their purpose. It may be in agriculture, it may not be, but regardless of your goals and aspirations, FFA will help you grow into someone who will make a difference.
  3. Lifelong Friends – Some of the most impactful relationships I have are because of my time in the FFA. I have friends from all over the country! When you graduate from FFA, the relationships do not become a thing of the past. The relationships will hold true because of the experiences you shared in the FFA.
  4. Opportunity to Travel – FFA can take you across the world!
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    FFA State Officers have the opportunity to participate in an international experience. This photo was taken in South Africa.

    On the local level, chapters will travel throughout their counties to state convention and to camps and conferences competing in contests, participating in service projects and gaining valuable leadership experiences. National FFA Convention is a great way for members to travel and meet people from all over. Each summer, FFA also hosts Washington Leadership Conference in D.C. This conference focuses on learning how to take action in your community and serve other people. Through my experiences in the FFA I have been all over the state of Minnesota, Washington D.C., about eight different states and even to South Africa. These were all unforgettable experiences that would have never been possible without the help of FFA.

  5. Scholarships – Each year, The National FFA Organization will give away $2.2 million in scholarships. How great is it that individuals and companies believe so highly in the future of agriculture that will donate this much to the education of students!
  6. 14469617_1287549081279258_348064421540300413_nCareer Preparation – In the FFA, there are Career Development Events (CDEs) and Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs) that are helping students prepare for future career endeavors in many agricultural pathways. At the national level there are 24 CDEs that all you to
    compete individually or with a team in areas ranging from marketing/communications to dairy cattle evaluation and parliamentary procedure to agricultural mechanics. Contests start at the local level and if you do well enough you can compete at state and national conventions. CDEs help give students real-life experiences in dif
    ferent career endeavors, not to mention they are a blast to be a part of!
  7. Advocates for Agriculture – FFA members everywhere are helping to bridge the gap between production agriculture and consumers. FFA members are the future veterinarians, scientists, farmers, animal nutritionists, Congressmen, teachers and so much more. They are going to make a positive difference in the agricultural community regardless of where the future will take them.
  8. Becoming a Part of Something Bigger – In my opinion, this is the best reason to celebrate FFA. FFA members are selfless. Chapters across the country participate in countless numbers of service projects and literacy events. Members are working hard to combat some of the biggest global challenges, including hunger. When FFA members put on that iconic corduroy jacket, there is nothing they cannot do.

At the Alliance, we are so fortunate that some of us had the opportunity to be a part of The National FFA Organization. Everyday lives are being positively impacted because of this organization and its members. I am forever thankful for the opportunities and experiences I have had through the FFA and I know thousands of other people feel the same way. This organization is helping students become lifelong advocates for agriculture.

Happy National Convention, FFA! Best of luck to the members and chapters competing in contests. Enjoy convention and all it has to offer, but remember you can always Celebrate FFA!


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14 things I bet you didn’t know about pig farming

Oink you glad it’s Porktober? Not only is it finally starting to feel like fall with pumpkin spice everything hitting the stores, but it is also Pork Month! Farmers are dedicated to caring for their pigs so we can enjoy bacon next to our eggs every month of the year. Here are a few things to know about pig farming because bacon doesn’t magically appear on our plates (although that would be awesome!).october-is

  1. There are five common types of pig farms. Today’s pig farms usually specialize in a certain period of the pigs’ life cycle. The five types of pig farms are: farrow-to-finish, farrow-to-nursery, farrow-to-wean, wean-to-finish and finishing. There are 67,000 total pig farms in the United States!twitter-pig-care
  2. Modern pig farms help farmers care for their pigs. Animal care is the number one priority for all farmers and modern farming systems allow farmers to embrace technology that allows them to take better care of their pigs. Temperature control, automatic water and feed dispensers and protection from predators are a few examples!
  3. Pig barn floors a designed to keep things clean. Floors in pig barns are slatted to allow farmers to easily hose and clean up after the pigs!
  4. All pigs are raised without added hormones! Some packaging labels claim that their pigs are raised without hormones, but ALL pigs are raised without added hormones. It is illegal to use added hormones in pig farming!hormones-twitter
  5. Pig farmers use less water, land and energy than ever before! Pig farmers live on or near the land that they farm, so they understand the importance of environmental stewardship. Between 1959-2009, pig farmers decreased land use by 78 percent and water use by 41 percent!pig-sustainability-twitter
  6. An adult female pig is called a sow. And a baby pig is a piglet; a young female pig that has not given birth is a gilt, a male pig is a boar and if castrated, barrow.
  7. Farrowing stalls help protect piglets. Farrowing stalls allow farmers to help in the birth process and reduce the number of piglets accidentally laid on or stepped on by the sow.farrowing-twitter
  8. Piglets are born with needle-teeth that are trimmed after birth. Farmers have learned more than a few things over the years, and one of them is to trim piglet teeth to prevent injuries to other piglets and the sow!
  9. Heating lamps are used to keep piglets warm. Heating lamps help keep piglets warm in the farrowing stall while keeping the sow cool.heating-lamp-tw
  10. Pig farmers work closely with veterinarians to ensure their animals receive the best care. Farmers and veterinarians learn from each other on how to improve and best take care of their animals. Farmers work with veterinarians to have animal care and health management plans on each farm.
  11. Pigs’ ears are used for identification. The left ear identifies the pig number within its litter and the right ear signals the litter number.
  12. Pigs eat a nutritionally-balanced diet every day. Pigs eat a grain-based diet of corn and soybean meal with wheat, barley, vitamins and minerals.
  13. Pig farmers are on social media! That’s right, pig farmers are on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram just like everyone else! Some farmers are very active on social media sharing their farm story and pig farmers are no exception. If you search the hashtag “#RealPigFarming” you can follow along with them and learn more about pig farming!
  14. Americans love pork! Ok, I bet you did know that – BUT maybe you didn’t know you can satisfy your pumpkin and pork craze at the same time! Here are few pumpkin-themed pork recipes for you to enjoy:

Happy Pork Month!